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 Post subject: newbie questions
PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2005 7:37 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 12:02 pm
Posts: 26
I'm getting back into windsurfing after taking over 10 years off. I'm 155 lbs and bought a
Bic Blast 74 last year. I wanted something with enough volume so I could up-haul it.
http://www.the-house.com/bc2617zzbic.html

I'm not sure if it is the board or I'm rusty. Every time I try to get into the foot straps, the board shoots up wind and I can't seem to control it to ride with the wind. If I put one foot about even with the mast and the other toward the 1st strap it feels OK. I also don't know where I should be putting the mast in the track. I have just been putting it in the middle. Back in the day as they say when I was doing it a lot, I could get in the straps and let her rip. Now, I feel like I'm learning all over. Am I missing something? I was riding on Sunday with a 7.4 sail and have also tried a seat harness and a chest harness. The chest harness feels a lot more comfortable, but I'm not sure if I have the lines in the correct spot. 7.4 is my largest sail and after seeing some 9s and 10s on Sunday and those guys ripping I know I need a larger sail. But, I want to be able to get into the straps and feel comfortable. I have them as far forward as I can.

Any words of wisdom?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2005 9:29 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 27, 2002 3:31 pm
Posts: 2146
Location: sblain@frontiernet.net
try moving your mastfoot forward a little.Drive the board off the wind with your front foot. Try to hang your weight off the boom as you bear away downwind to accelerate the board onto the plane. At the same time pull down a little on your fronthand to increase the mast foot preasure.
The modern boards require bearing away a little more to get them going than the old boards


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2005 10:00 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jul 09, 2004 6:11 pm
Posts: 73
Location: Highland Park, St. Paul
I had the exact same problem when planing and learning to enter the straps. I was positioning my feet over the rail and applying to much pressure causing the board to ride on its side and carve upwind. Watch your feet placement and try to keep the board flat. Hope this helps...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2005 10:08 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 03, 2003 3:57 pm
Posts: 19
Location: Eden Prairie
I can totally relate. Last year I finally exchanged my 80's boards for the new stuff and I felt like a clown on those boards. What helped me is first of all to make sure your sail is downhauled enough. Second, I had my boom too low. Third, Windsurfing Magazine had an article where they advised to have your harness lines further back (away from the mast)than ususal. I tried it all a couple of weeks ago and I had my first good day! It also does not help that Minnesota winds are little less constant than what I was used to. I was going in and out of the footstraps all the time. With modern sails, I need to rig bigger than I am used to and just downhaul it good.
I hope this helps!
Jan


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2005 1:44 am 
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Joined: Thu May 08, 2003 2:31 pm
Posts: 3
Location: Kailua Oahu, Hawaii
I got to sail briefly on a 9.6m sail and a 151 liter board on Sunday (muito obrigado, Luiz!) and even though I'm about your size (157 lbs) I had a tough time getting onto a plane. So don't beat yourself up, your biggest problem may have been sheer lack of wind.

The new boards, however, have gotten a lot shorter and wider (which you've noticed), with a flatter bottom shape and no dagger board. There is nothing but the skeg to keep them tracking straight, and the skeg doesn't really function until you've reached planing speed. So, if you lean back against your somewhat-powered sail at low board speed, you'll just push the tail of the board away from you and pivot upwind. Being light on your feet at slow to moderate speed is the key.

Like the other posters mentioned:
try turning the board deep downwind (broad reach at least),
sheeting OUT the sail (think of the wind blowing across the sail like a wing, not into it like a wall),
and hanging DOWN on the booms (knees bent and boom over your head like a monkey bar) instead of leaning back against the sail.

Then, once you've really gained some board speed and are breaking a plane you can get in the straps, start leaning against the sail and pushing laterally against the fin.

Good luck, and welcome back to windsurfing.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2005 8:41 am 
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Joined: Fri Apr 11, 2003 1:01 pm
Posts: 175
You may also want to think about some lighter air equipment. One way to get to spend more time planing -- and less time "comp-planing" -- is to get one of the really wide boards. I sail my Start in less than 12 knots, and my Go 165 in more than 12 knots, and find them much easier to get on the plane and keep on the plane in less than a really solid 15 than my smaller board. Plus: once on the plane they can be at least as fast in light wind as the smaller boards (with good technique). I'm in the minority even here in Minnesota, but I think these new Formula-wide boards with big fins and big sails really open up the pleasures of light wind sailing!

John


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2005 11:17 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jul 04, 2003 9:40 am
Posts: 70
Location: Blaine,Mn.
I agree with John...if it wern't for my 9.6 and my Big Board (Bic Nova) I wouldn't get out sailing half as much as I do. You can grow old in this state waiting for a 6.5-7.5 day! Doug

_________________
DDD


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 Post subject: Newbie - part 2
PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2005 9:56 am 
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Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 12:02 pm
Posts: 26
Anyone out there want to help a newbie get back into sailing? With this new equipment, there seems to be a lot to know to get the right set-up. I live by Calhoun, so that would be the best for me for a meeting place. I'm willing to pay, get you a 6-pack or tune your bike for trade. Next semi windy day would be great.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2005 11:07 am 
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Joined: Fri Apr 11, 2003 1:01 pm
Posts: 175
Jared:

I'm happy to help on days I sail. I sail out of WBL, but if you're up there one day, you're welcome to borrow one of my wide boards, to see what wide board sailing is all about :-).

John


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2005 4:07 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 18, 2004 6:06 am
Posts: 51
Jared,

I also sail mostly out of WBL but could meet you one day at Calhoun. I have a wide board you are welcome to try out!
lupoky@hotmail.com


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 Post subject: Getting a light wind board
PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2005 3:36 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 12:02 pm
Posts: 26
I'm looking at getting a light wind board.

I'm 5'9, 155lbs

I currently have a Bic Blast 74, 140 liter board

Anyone have any recommendations for the following:
1) Bic Nova
2) Exocet Turbo Formula 100
3) Starboard GO 170 or 185
4) BIC TECHNO FORMULA
5) F2 Discovery 170


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2005 4:46 pm 
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Joined: Fri Apr 11, 2003 1:01 pm
Posts: 175
I only have experience with Starboard equipment. (No connection to the company; I just buy their boards.) I like the Go 165 very much. At my 195 lbs it's not a great light wind board for me, but it's great when the wind picks up -- and my wife and daughter both love it in light air, and they're closer to your weight than I am. Based on that experience, I think you'd be better off with the Go 170 than the Go 185.

There is a tradeoff on the light wind side of the equation. The Go 185 is nearly 100 cm, so it has the ability to get on the plane with less wind power than the 90 cm Go 170. On the other hand, the Go 170 will work a little better in the higher winds. I think either of the boards would be great, but at your weight, I'd probably go with the Go 170.

John


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 Post subject: Newbie
PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2005 12:51 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 23, 2003 6:33 pm
Posts: 279
Location: white bear lake
I have a Starboard GO 180 L and I LOVE it. It is nice and wide, but once you get it up on a plane it really doesn't feel as big as it looks. I am about 6'3" 210 lbs.

Excellent tips that were given (I made note of them). One of biggest things that helped me to get up and plane out was to pull DOWN on the boom to transfer that energy directly into the board. Once you have everything else dialed in, pull down and it will be like hititng a gas pedal.

I am usually out at WBL whenever I can get out (look for tall blond guy, 30 years old) and introduce yourself.

Have fun!
Mike


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